pomelopng

As a toddler, my #3 kid always had a penchant for large-format fruits & vegetables. Not to eat, but as companions.

When she was little, she would insist on adopting vegetables from the grocery store and carrying them with her everywhere.

The winter squashes would last until she lost interest in them, but I'd have to steal the eggplants and papayas from her arms while she slept once they started to rot.

She's now 6' tall and almost 15, but she still has these tendencies.

Recently, when we were in Vancouver visiting her older brother (my #2 kid) we spied a display of enormous pomelos at a market. I knew as soon as I saw them, strange, green and huge, that she'd have to have one.

The substantial green pomelo hung out with her in her room for a couple of days before I suggested we eat it. She's more of a rational adult than an obsessive toddler these days, so she agreed.

But I had no idea what a pomelo was exactly.

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Turns out it's ancient.

One of the three original citrus species, in fact, along with citron (which is fairly inedible) and mandarin.

So there's no doubt pomelos were an ancestral food source for people in South East Asia, where they originated.

I now know that oranges are a hybrid of mandarins and pomelos, and grapefruits a further iteration, a hybrid of oranges and pomelos.

Their Latin name Citrus Maxima is appropriate, as pomelos can apparently get even bigger than the one recently adopted by my kid: they can weigh as much as 4½ lbs each.

This pomelo recipe was 100% inspired by my various children. When I consulted my #1 kid, she told me the secret to sweetening a grapefruit is to add salt, not sugar.

And I contributed too, because when in doubt I figure just add Balsamic Vinegar & run it (whatever 'it' may be) under a broiler!

To continue with my unintentional but emerging breakfast theme, which started with London Fog Lattes & Daikon Confit Hash, here's my newest wintertime breakfast treat:

Toasted Balsamic Pomelo

 from Biohack u 

  • 1 Pomelo
  • 2 tablespoons Balsamic Vinegar
  • 2 pinches salt

Preheat the broiler to 500.

Slice the Pomelo in half, like a grapefruit. Also, like a grapefruit, separate each section from the surrounding membrane with a sharp knife.

Place the Pomelo halves, cut side up in a baking dish, Pour 1 tablespoon of Balsamic Vinegar over each half, and sprinkle a pinch of salt over top.

Place the Pomelo under the broiler for 10 minutes, until slightly scorched & steaming.

Enjoy hot or cold. 

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